Stuff I Like (and paid for*)

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*I did pay full retail for this product

Cloth Diapers – The Sane Way

I was taking out the trash about three months ago and I became overwhelmed by the hugeness of the bag of diapers our petite baby churns out in less than a week. I guess I had considered options other than disposables, but time and sleep had escaped me.  When I finally took a breath (and had a solid night’s slumber) I decided to look into the world of cloth diapers.

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Baby M sporting her gDiaper.

To my not-so-surprise, I found out that the Breastfeeding Mafia (militant breastfeeders) overlap with the Cloth Diaper Commies.  There are about a bazillion brands of diapers, most resembling the complexity of a Rubik’s Cube to snap on the baby. Everyone has an opinion. Some are made by WAHM’s (work-at-home-moms, not George and Andrew’s fabulous 80’s pop band, thanks auto-correct), some are “one size fits all” (you haven’t met my baby) and some are, well, seemingly impossible to wrap your head around (or wrap around a squirming baby). And the Cloth Diaper Commies seem to wear these things like a badge—the more difficult the system, the more time consuming the washing and the cheaper they can be obtained, the better. They write about having “six of the Bunnybutts, four Charlie Potatoes, a couple Poo Catchers,” etc. (all names fabricated).  Some of these folks are buying them used. USED!!! It was difficult to do real research. But that’s kind of a sign of the times I guess.

As I looked into costs and environmental impact, I found a bit of seemingly credible information regarding the hidden costs of cloth diapers. You see, these cloth diapers take water and energy to wash. If you have a regular style washer it fills up every time. Now if you go through, say, 18 diapers in two or three days, they won’t come close to being a full washer load. So you either need to own so many cloth diapers that it makes a full load (and store them dirty in between— think about that) or you are wasting a ton of water.  A HE (high efficiency) washer doles out water for small loads, but it still takes water and energy.  I don’t need to explain why you might want to wash diapers by themselves in hot water.

But still, the thought of that huge bag of disposables in the landfill haunted me.  And the “green” disposable diapers inside a plastic garbage bag really didn’t seem like a better solution. Also, they are wicked pricy.

No pants needed when you're g'd.

No pants needed when you’re g’d.

After lots of web surfing I found gDiapers. Now it’s important to understand that this brand kept coming up as the most hated brand by the Cloth Diaper Commies and Breastfeeding Mafia.  It drove my curiosity. And finally my wallet.

I purchased two of the gDiaper gPants, which are the outer layer. They come with a snap-in breathable but waterproof pocket (I call it the poo-catcher) and then your choice of a hemp/fleecy strip of absorbent material or a disposable fiber over stuffing pad. They do a great job describing how it works on their site here. It was the flushable option that really drew me in; these liners are compostable but also flushable. FLUSHABLE! You tear them open and shake out the fuzzy stuff and flush.  We were a little concerned about the fiber outer layer, so we put that in the trash. It is about the same amount of material as a paper towel. But you can flush them if you trust your toilet.

After the MDOD (messy diaper of the day) I put a disposable liner in a gPant and Velcro-ed it to M’s cute bum (ick, I know). When she needed a change I ripped and flushed.  Life was good.  I ordered six more here.

Certainly I was afraid of what every parent would be at this point: POOP!  But the first time poo happened, the poo-catcher caught it all. I bought extras of those and they snap right out and wash. That happens maybe once a day.

Next I tried out the fabric liners. Not to give TMI, but usually I can predict that one MDOD, after which we can switch to the cloth for the day.  When those get wet we rinse and throw in a pail to be washed at a later date. If I wanted to use them full-time, gDiaper makes a disposable sheet that sits on top. We had a successful MDOD on one of those too, no issues.

Easy to organize - snap-in liners, diapers and inserts.

Easy to organize – snap-in liners, diapers and inserts.

We’ve been using these for about three months and have phased out all disposables except at night, and that’s only because we are trying to use up the diapers we bought.  When those are gone we plan to use a disposable liner over a cloth liner at night.  Right now we double diaper at night for “overflow”.

The verdict?  These are awesome and here’s why:

Easy. They Velcro on.  A friend of mine was recently relating a babysitting tale to me about another friend who was using a one-size-fits-all snappy diaper. She didn’t feel that she knew how to close them and would give up and use a disposable when she was watching the kids.  Bottom line: we have been able to use them with all the grandparents with no hassle because they are easy to use. Grandparents even! What’s the point of using cloth if it’s so complicated that people will give up and use disposables?!

Hybrid option. The disposable inserts are the best of both worlds. The outer pants get reused for a day or two without washing because nothing gross touches them. The pocket inside gets reused a few times for wet diapers because you can give them a quick wipe. Or it snaps out and is washable. The disposable liner gets flushed.  A week’s worth of trash for us now looks like what a day’s worth used to. But we aren’t using much extra water and energy because the outer parts can be washed in the regular cold cycle with her clothes (remember, no poo touched them).

Portability. When we leave the house I bring a second assembled diaper. For changes on the go I just take one off and put the other on. I also bring extra disposable liners. If we’re out, they flush in a bathroom or can go in the trash. I know that many cloth diaper folks still rely on disposables out and for babysitting, but with these you don’t have to. We have changed M on the side of a mountain with these. No problem.

An entire week's worth of diaper garbage - with baby for scale. And technically we could have flushed this too.

An entire week’s worth of diaper garbage – with baby for scale. And technically we could have flushed this too.

Cost. No lie, the start-up is more. For about $200 you can have enough parts to diaper with these full time. That includes six pants that come with the snap-in liner, six extra snap-in liners, eighteen cloth liners and a pack of disposables.  The disposables, when bought in the bulk 84-pack, cost about a penny more per use than disposables at Costco. And they are very, very absorbent. In fact, our baby used to fuss the very second wetness touched the disposables. She fusses far less now. I believe the liners are free of chemicals and gels, but they still work great. No rash, no fuss.

Cuteness. You can’t put a price on this one. It’s hot out, and we can just put a t-shirt and one of these on her and go. They come in fun colors and patterns and look like little pants.

Velcro is to the back. I’m not going to dare her, but it would probably be hard(er) for her to, um, free herself with this design than if the closure was to the front.

Fit. I’m not buying the “one-size-fits all” claim. I’ve seen what some of those diapers look like and poor M would have had so much extra material around her she wouldn’t have been able to move.  Not to mention that I’m sure they wouldn’t have held tight on the legs, which of course means the dreaded MDOD might have leaked. gDiapers come in Newborn, S, M, L and XL, and the inner parts come in two sizes; Newborn/S and M/L/XL.

Great customer service.  I realize it isn’t a WAHM company; it’s slightly bigger than that, but still small. They have online chat with educated users who can help you answer questions from their experience.

Auto-ship. You can set up to have the liners auto-shipped at regular intervals. Because even though Babies-R-Us sells them, their display is very small and they don’t seem to stock a ton of product. Or maybe you don’t even live close to one.  The shipping is free and they just show up.

Drawbacks. They are more expensive to use than disposables. I’m thinking of it as an investment in a better world for her later. Also, because there are four sizes you have to buy new outer pants when they outgrow them. However, the Newborn and Small take the same snap-in liner and inner liner as do the M, L and XL. So once you get into M you are set with your liners.

They look great when M is flying her hippy flag!

They look great when M is flying her hippy flag!

We didn’t use these as a newborn, and frankly, I’m not sure how that would go with any cloth system. MDOD is more like MDOH (messy diaper of the hour) with the tiny babies, so who knows. I will say that if I had it to do over I would at least try it. gDiaper recommends using the disposable (flushable compostable) liners for newborns rather than cloth; a much more achievable goal than cloth every ten minutes!

I’m not sure why there is so much gDiaper hate out there on the message boards, but then again, I’m also not sure why there is so much bad grammar. We’ll never know. What I do know is this: if you’re environmentally concerned and moderately intelligent, the gDiaper is a great option for those who truly want to reduce waste, but don’t want to spend every spare moment of the day dealing with diaper logistics. And did I mention they are cute?

UPDATE—We are now 19 months into baby #2. We are using all of our original gDiaper outers and a combination of original and replaced fabric liners. This time we gDiapered from the time we got home from the hospital. Life is good, expenses are much lower, and many of our diapers have been handed off to a friend for a third life.

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